Stoneybatter Street History – Manor Street/Manor Place

Photo: Stoneybatter street history #1Manor Street/Manor Place.These streets take their names from the medieval manor of Grangegorman. During the medieval era manors were large farm  units which also had a political function as those living on a manor were bound by its manor court. The Grangegorman Manor was owned by the Priory of the Holy Trinity (Christchurch). It is generally thought to have been situated north of the junction of Aughrim Street and Prussia street although some associated builings such as the Manor house, administrative centre and farm buildings were situated off Brunswick Street around the site of the Richmond hospital. One of the earliest list of residents in the Smithfield/Stoneybatter region survives in the account rolls of the priory. If you travelled back to 1326 you would meet people such as Robert Le Dryver, a poor labourer who owned a cottage for which he paid the priory twelve pence each year along with four days labour. From his name, its clear Robert was a ploughman, le Dryvere refers to his work of driving of the plough. His neighbours included Christina the widow who rented a cottage for two shilling per year. Richer neighbours included Alexander Attewell who rented one messuage and eighteen acres of land for which he paid 24 shillings and 8 pence. Other tenants included William and Jordan Carectarius (carter), Michael Carrik, Joseph Triturator (thresher) and Roger de Kent (of Kent).Source: Mills, J (1996)  Account Roll of the Priory of the Holy Trinity, Dublin. Four Courts Press

Manor Street and Manor Place take their names from the medieval manor of Grangegorman. During the medieval era manors were large farm units which also had a political function as those living on a manor were bound by a manor court. The Grangegorman Manor was owned by the Priory of the Holy Trinity (Christchurch). It is generally thought to have been situated north of the junction of Aughrim Street and Prussia street although some associated builings such as the Manor house, administrative centre and farm buildings were situated off Brunswick Street around the site of the Richmond hospital. One of the earliest list of residents in the Smithfield/Stoneybatter region survives in the account rolls of the priory. If you travelled back to 1326 you would meet people such as Robert Le Dryver, a poor labourer who owned a cottage for which he paid the priory twelve pence each year along with four days labour. From his name, its clear Robert was a ploughman, le Dryvere refers to his work of driving of the plough. His neighbours included Christina the widow who rented a cottage for two shilling per year. Richer neighbours included Alexander Attewell who rented one messuage and eighteen acres of land for which he paid 24 shillings and 8 pence. Other tenants included William and Jordan Carectarius (carter), Michael Carrik, Joseph Triturator (thresher) and Roger de Kent (of Kent).
Source: Mills, J (1996) Account Roll of the Priory of the Holy Trinity, Dublin. Four Courts Press

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